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New to Dremels
Spike9077
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Alabama, United States
Joined: May 07, 2002
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Posted: Monday, May 27, 2002 - 10:07 AM UTC
Hi All,
I have been reading up a lot on scratchbuilding and other modelling tips and techniques and found that to do almost anything worth while requires a dremel rotary tool. I wanted to buy one so I've been surfing the web for prices and found that there are a lot of options. Does anyone have any reccomendations on what to buy for a relatively cheap price?

Thanks,
Mark
Sabot
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Posted: Monday, May 27, 2002 - 11:17 AM UTC
Wal-Mart, my local one had the sets on sale. Rotary tool with a bunch of attachments for about $30ish. Check them out, your local store may have them on sale.
Eagle
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Noord-Brabant, Netherlands
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 03:36 AM UTC
I really can't help you here, because I don't know what is sold in your country.

What I do know is that we have an awful lot of different brands over here. The most expensive being Dremel, but also a whole range of cheaper models.

As for me personally, I wouldn't go for Dremel, but settle for a cheaper brand. Since we hardly ever have to use extreme force or drill large holes, a cheaper model will do just fine (Dremel is a genuine POWER tool, but maybe just a bit overpowered for our hobby as we compare prices).

What is important is that you can regulate the speed, since plastic tends to melt very quickly at high speeds. Therefore always start drilling, sanding or sawing plastic at low speed first before you raise it to the optimum speed.

GunTruck
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 03:43 AM UTC
Mark - I don't presume to know what's expensive for you, but I have the Dremel rotary tool and Dremel's Mighty Mite battery-powered tool.

The Mighty Mite, to me, is worth the asking price. It turns at lower revolutions than the more powerful rotary Dremel - perfect for modeling in plastic, aluminum, and resins. The battery charge lasts a long time too.

The rotary tool is nice, I mounted mine in Dremel's Drill Press, which worked out nicely.

Gunnie
Eagle
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 03:55 AM UTC
But then you're a General Gunnie...... us NCO's and CO's DO have to watch our wallets more than you Generals do...... :-)
m1garand
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 03:57 AM UTC
I have the Mighty Mite. It works great for me. Don't know how I got along without it.
GunTruck
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 03:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text

But then you're a General Gunnie...... us NCO's and CO's DO have to watch our wallets more than you Generals do...... :-)



LOL! :-) Well, I might be a Sergeant once again soon - been considering rejoining the military - the Air Force Reserve...

I'll turn in my rotary Dremel at that time...

Gunnie
Eagle
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 04:04 AM UTC

Quoted Text

LOL! Well, I might be a Sergeant once again soon - been considering rejoining the military - the Air Force Reserve...

I'll turn in my rotary Dremel at that time...



Remember that Spike, you'll soon be the new owner.......



Sergeant without Dremel seeks dito wife......

:-)
Spike9077
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 04:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Remember that Spike, you'll soon be the new owner.......


Ya I dont think so! :-) :-)

Thanks everyone for all your advice. I think I'll go to Walmart or Target and see if they have the Mighty Mite. If not I'll probably get something else. But I don't think I'll be going to K*Mart. :-) :-) :-)

Mark
slodder
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North Carolina, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 04:24 AM UTC
Spike - any brand should do, any department store should cary them. I think in my area KMart is the cheapest.
My recommendation would to get one with at least two speeds (Hi/Low). A variable one would be even better.
You're looking at $30 and up
Or
Check out Ebay
matt
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 07:30 AM UTC
I bought a dremel almost 10? years ago. I've put a new shaft in it. (variable speed) I was in Sears in Nov. and found a returned variable speed w/ a flexishaft for around 50.00 my "old" dremel has the flexishat attached and the new one is used alone...in the drill press, router attachment or right angle attachment. I would recomend the variadle speed if you can afford it. HTH

Matt
ARENGCA
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Posted: Tuesday, May 28, 2002 - 08:58 AM UTC
I picked up a small one at Sears a while back. It has a rechargable, removable battery and two speeds. I have a full size variable speed Dremel that I inherited about 20 years ago, and have found that I rarely use it at anything but the lowest setting, at least for modelling purposes. I like the little one because it has no cord, and comes with a chuck instead of the collets that you have to change in and out. It also travels well, because of the small size.

For thinning or grinding off, one tip I have for you is to invest in several bits known as "high-speed cutters". I have found that they do a good job of removing plastic without the heat build up that abrasive bits or sanding bits have. Keep the bit moving across the area you are thinning or grinding to keep the heat build up down.

For cutting out openings, I have also used the newer "rotary saw" (like in a dry-wall router, looks like a drill bit but cuts in whichever direction you move it) to good effect. Be carefull with this one, though. It likes to pull to one side as you move it, and your cuts can curve right out of the lines. My technique for cutting openings is to only cut to within 1/8"-1/16" of the cut line, and finish the edges off with sanding sticks/files and hobby knife.

Hope all of this helps.
sourkraut
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Posted: Wednesday, May 29, 2002 - 02:13 AM UTC
well my dremel is 10 years old and i havent done anything to it.but if you want top of the line i was at sears and saw the craftsman line on moto-tools.i dont remember what they cost but it seems to me they were pretty saltly
matt
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Posted: Friday, May 31, 2002 - 09:04 AM UTC
The craftsman is a REBOXED Dremel. The guts are identical.

Matt
sourkraut
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Posted: Friday, May 31, 2002 - 05:54 PM UTC

Quoted Text

The craftsman is a REBOXED Dremel. The guts are identical.

Matt


thanks for the info i was not aware of that
Spike9077
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Alabama, United States
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Posted: Saturday, June 01, 2002 - 01:45 AM UTC

Quoted Text

For cutting out openings, I have also used the newer "rotary saw" (like in a dry-wall router, looks like a drill bit but cuts in whichever direction you move it) to good effect. Be carefull with this one, though. It likes to pull to one side as you move it, and your cuts can curve right out of the lines. My technique for cutting openings is to only cut to within 1/8"-1/16" of the cut line, and finish the edges off with sanding sticks/files and hobby knife.

Hope all of this helps.


ARENGCA, I never thought of that rotary saw. I've seen it advetised onTV, but didn't know it would be useful for modelling. How much does that cost? Looks like I'm gonna making a pretty big hole in my wallet.

Thanks,
Mark
NeilUnreal
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Posted: Sunday, June 02, 2002 - 10:49 PM UTC
One more vote for the Dremel Mini-Mite. On plastic I use it about ten times as often as my big Dremel. The Mini-Mite has just the right low-speed torque to grind and cut plastic without as much risk of melting it. It also weighs a lot less.

-Neil