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Tools & Supplies: Compressors
Talk about compressors.
Hosted by Matt Leese
Opinions on "very quiet" compressors
DeskJockey
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Virginia, United States
Joined: July 17, 2006
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Posted: Monday, June 10, 2013 - 12:04 PM UTC
I'm looking to upgrade my current Harbor Freight compressor, which is too noisy to use when the kids are sleeping (which is when I have time to model) and is beginning to leak air around the tank pressure relief valve. I have been looking at the Iwata Power Jet/Power Jet Pro, Silentaire Scorpion II-TT, Sparmax TC-620, and California Air Tools 1650A because all of these models are reportedly very quiet. I found decibel ratings for the Silentaire and California Air Tools (both around 55), but not the other two.

Does anyone have any opinions about these compressors (good or bad)? Are they reliable? How well do they perform? How quiet are they (I model in the room right next to my sleeping 18-month-old, so noise reduction is key)?

As part of my search for a replacement, I have considered--and discarded--a CO2 tank and larger multipurpose compressor with a big tank. Neither option fits my needs--there is no CO2 distributor near me (I researched this), and a larger compressor would not fit in my garage and can't be easily piped into the room I use even if I could fit it in.
viper29_ca
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New Brunswick, Canada
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Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 04:02 AM UTC
I personally use the Harder & Steenbeck Euro Teck 10A



Very quiet according to the specs from my supplier, it runs at about 38db. No tank, but is pretty quiet.

Depending on where your compressor is sitting, you can quite it down by getting a piece of 2" foam, like they use for insulating houses, cut an indentation for the feet and sit your compressor on it, would quiet it down even more.
pseudorealityx
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Georgia, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 04:24 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I personally use the Harder & Steenbeck Euro Teck 10A



Very quiet according to the specs from my supplier, it runs at about 38db. No tank, but is pretty quiet.

Depending on where your compressor is sitting, you can quite it down by getting a piece of 2" foam, like they use for insulating houses, cut an indentation for the feet and sit your compressor on it, would quiet it down even more.



I would suggest that insulating an air cooled motor is a poor idea.
viper29_ca
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New Brunswick, Canada
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Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 03:30 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I personally use the Harder & Steenbeck Euro Teck 10A



Very quiet according to the specs from my supplier, it runs at about 38db. No tank, but is pretty quiet.

Depending on where your compressor is sitting, you can quite it down by getting a piece of 2" foam, like they use for insulating houses, cut an indentation for the feet and sit your compressor on it, would quiet it down even more.



I would suggest that insulating an air cooled motor is a poor idea.



Its not being insulated, just a base of styrofoam for the compressor to sit on. The foam just absorbs the vibrations from the compressor. The cooling holes around the compressor body are still fully open.

It is just a way to get an already quite compressor, just a little quieter.
pseudorealityx
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Georgia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 04:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I personally use the Harder & Steenbeck Euro Teck 10A



Very quiet according to the specs from my supplier, it runs at about 38db. No tank, but is pretty quiet.

Depending on where your compressor is sitting, you can quite it down by getting a piece of 2" foam, like they use for insulating houses, cut an indentation for the feet and sit your compressor on it, would quiet it down even more.



I would suggest that insulating an air cooled motor is a poor idea.



Its not being insulated, just a base of styrofoam for the compressor to sit on. The foam just absorbs the vibrations from the compressor. The cooling holes around the compressor body are still fully open.

It is just a way to get an already quite compressor, just a little quieter.



Check, I mis-read your earlier post as sitting the unit "IN" the foam, not on top of the foam.

The quietest solution is still to just use a compressed air tank, but it's potentially a bit more costly to set up.
Teaker11
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California, United States
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Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 05:44 AM UTC
Have you considered the placement of the compressor, in garage, basement and running a 3/8 poly line into the room you use. My compressor is in the garage 80 gallon and I have piped the garage in 1/2 pvc for outlets for air tools and then a 1/4 inch ploy line into my office for air in there. also I have 3 switches on in the office, 2 in the garage for a low voltage relay to turn the compressor off and on. to combat moisture in the air I have a plug in air dryer for the airbrush with a regulator and in the office a dryer regulator on my desk. I only use air tools so this works great for me.
jim
Grauwolf
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Quebec, Canada
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Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 06:23 AM UTC
If money is not a factor, Silentaire 20A.

No louder than a slight hum and will last you a lifetime.

Cheers,
Joe
pseudorealityx
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Georgia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 07:21 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Have you considered the placement of the compressor, in garage, basement and running a 3/8 poly line into the room you use. My compressor is in the garage 80 gallon and I have piped the garage in 1/2 pvc for outlets for air tools and then a 1/4 inch ploy line into my office for air in there. also I have 3 switches on in the office, 2 in the garage for a low voltage relay to turn the compressor off and on. to combat moisture in the air I have a plug in air dryer for the airbrush with a regulator and in the office a dryer regulator on my desk. I only use air tools so this works great for me.
jim




Please please please, for your own safety, get rid of ANY PVC lines carrying compressed air. They are not designed for compressed air, and it's dangerous.

PVC is a terrible material for compressed gases. Use black iron or copper for hard lines to your drops.
raypalmer
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Ontario, Canada
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Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2013 - 01:46 PM UTC
Grex AC1810 is pretty good and very affordable.

You can buy the heavy rubberized flexible hose and cut it to necessary lengths and terminate them with mechanical clamps and knurled fittings. Available at your local home depot.

I know that PVC system you can buy. I'd stick with the heavy flex line for cheapness, ruggedness and ease of repair.