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Tools & Supplies: Compressors
Talk about compressors.
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Compressors
JohnFrank
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Maryland, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 06:24 PM UTC
Hey Folks!

Read the posts back a couple of years but really didn't find one which really helps me. So, here goes....

Based on my Internet research (and the posts I've read here), I've decided that I want an airbrush compressor with a tank attached so that the compressor doesn't run too much. I sort of had it narrowed down to between a Badger TC910 and a Paasche D3000R. I found a pretty good deal on the TC910 and was headed in that direction (also because getting a TC910 would give me an "all Badger" configuration to go along with my Badger Patriot 105), but now the dealer is telling me that he's out of stock in this model. Amazon is saying that delivery of this model is now expected to run between 2 to 6 months. Frankly, I don't want to wait around that long because I want to get set up and begin learning how to use my airbrush.

Anyone care to weigh in on their experience with either of these models? What about experience with other models with an attached air tank? Please remember that I am retired, so cost/price is a real concern to me ~ I really need to stay around $200.00, preferably less.

And, while my thoughts are running in this direction, what's your experience in both the maximum and "standard running" PSI that you use while airbrushing? Does that depend on the type of paint and/or manufacturer you're using; I believe some paints have a higher pigmentation and does that require higher PSI? What exactly are the variable that can affect what PSI you need?

Many thanks and have a great day!!

John
edmund
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 06:33 PM UTC
What is it you want the air compressor to do ? Any air compressor capable of delivering 25 pounds or more of air pressure will work with an airbrush , now if you have a tank it will cycle less the bigger the air tank the less the cycle . A moisture trap and a pressure regulator helps . Now if you get the right type of compressor you can use also to drive air powered tools , you just have to have the volume of air to work the tool . Last is the noise level of the compressor , how much are you willing to put up with . The choice is yours .
MLD
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Vermont, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 06:45 PM UTC
I know your post specifically mentions compressors, but have you looked into using a CO2 tank instead?

Unless you plan to run air tools with it as well, CO2 has numerous advantages.

Silent (even a tanked compressor has to run the motor to keep the tank topped up)
dry (no need for an inline moisture trap)
constant and exact pressure

Local welding gas suppliers can set you up for under your price point.

I switched 10+ yrs ago and have never looked back.
Mike
JohnFrank
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 08:15 PM UTC
What do I want my compressor to do? Just power my airbrush to paint model armor kits. No model aircraft, no model ships, no power tools (e.g., nail gun, etc.). Basically, very limited use, to answer that question.
JohnFrank
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 08:19 PM UTC
Mike ~ Yes, I've seen some reference to using a CO tank too. Going to do more research into that too before I pull the trigger on a compressor. Need to stop by Home Depot tomorrow anyways.... Thanks for replying!!
matt
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 08:35 PM UTC
I went & exchanged my C02 tank after about 4 years (not a whole lot of building) but the cost was like $21 for the swap vs around $17 4 yrs ago (Now it is a new supplier... and the stupid hazmat charge was almost $1.50 higher because of that.


I prefer to spray with CO2 over compressed air because of the moisture issue.
Alystyr
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Posted: Wednesday, April 08, 2015 - 08:47 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I prefer to spray with CO2 over compressed air because of the moisture issue.


Nitrogen is also a good alternative.
I don't know what the price difference is, if any, but it should be just as safe & easy as CO2. Plus the fact that they fill optical devices (binoculars, etc.) with it seems to point toward good moisture issues.
JohnFrank
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Posted: Friday, April 10, 2015 - 05:48 PM UTC
Is this stuff like the nitrous oxide they give you sometimes at the dentist's office? Wow, talking about killing 2 birds with 1 stone!!! But seriously, thanks for the suggestion~ I'll look into it!