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Tools & Supplies: Compressors
Talk about compressors.
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My compresor the wrong type?
TankTrap
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Invercargill, New Zealand
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 04:32 AM UTC
um i bought a compresor and it requires oil befor you use it will this oil come through the airflow and into my paint.
Should i be using another type of compressor?
HeavyArty
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 04:50 AM UTC
Yup. You need an oilless compressor. Check out the home/hobby compressors that are available at Wal-Mart or the likes. Make sure you get one with an air tank and regulator, etc. attached as well.
TankTrap
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 04:54 AM UTC
Dam Have to take that one back then.
3442
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 05:19 AM UTC
DO NOT BUY A NEW COMPRESSOR!!!!
sry to disagree with gino but he's somewhat off the line :-) (no pun intended! you just need to set up an oil filter and your gonna be fine, my father built his own compressor and all back when he did bodywork on cars and all you need is a regular oil filter in your system to prevent the oil from entering your ab, rather easy to do i believe you jsut need the proper adaptors

But hey, if they do take it back its a hastle less i believe

Frank
ws48
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 05:52 AM UTC
David,

I found this information on compressors using oil:

Many articulated-piston compressors are oil lubricated. That is, they have an oil bath that splash-lubricates the bearings and cylinder walls as the crank rotates. The pistons have rings that help keep the compressed air on top of the piston and keep the lubricating oil away from the air. Rings, though, are not completely effective, so some oil will enter the compressed air in aerosol form.

Having oil in the air isn't necessarily a problem. Many air tools require oiling, and inline oilers are often added to increase a uniform supply to the tool. On the down side, these models require regular oil checks, periodic oil changes and they must be operated on a level surface. Most of all, there are some tools and situations that require oilfree air. Spray painting with oil in the airstream will cause finish problems. And many new woodworking air tools such as nailers and sanders are designed to be oilfree so there's no chance of fouling wood surfaces with oil. While solutions to the airborne oil problem include using an oil separator or filter in the air line, a better idea is to use an oilfree compressor that uses permanently lubricated bearings in place of the oil bath.

Don
TankTrap
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Invercargill, New Zealand
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 07:10 AM UTC
Thanks guys.
ive decided to take the thing back and spend the money on a tamiya HG airbrush thats only going to set me back about $200.
i will continue to burrow my mates compreser until i can find a compresor that does not need oil.
HeavyArty
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 09:10 AM UTC
Good choice. I still say it isn't worth the hassle of messing with an oil compressor, especially with the relatively cheap, quality oilless compressors out there. You can use them, but why?
propboy44256
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 05:12 PM UTC
I dont know if the have Wallmarts in your country, but the sell oilless campbell hausfield 2 gallon compressrs for less than $99 US dollers here in the states, perfect compressor for airbrush
Henk
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 05:35 PM UTC
If you are willing and able to spend the money, look at a Ripmax. I bought one recently, and it is realy quiet. It makes a small humming noise when it's running. It is one of the best purchases I've made. They cost around 150 (in the UK) but worth every penny. Most of these "wallmart" compressors are like industial ones, i.e. you need ear defenders when runing one.. :-)

Cheers
Henk
HunterCottage
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 06:18 PM UTC
I have a silent compressor Silair and it requires oil, but this is a professional grade airbrushing compressor. I guess it depends on what type of compressor it is, but it is my understanding that oil in a compressor, doesn't necessarily mean oil in the airline. I've had it for a year now, and no problems with it. No problems with painting at all. No noise either, just the snorting of the shut-off valve - but now that scares me half to death...
RobinNilsson
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 08:07 PM UTC
I just want to chime in with Brian on this.
I also have a SilAir and there has never been a problem
with oil. It comes equipped with an oil&water filter but that
filter was as dry as anything after two years of frequent use.
The little oil and water that had come out from the compressor
had condensed in the pressure tank and after 2-3 years I
opened the bottom plug and it all came out that way, all of
two spoonfuls and Stockholm isn't in the middle of a desert.

If there is a tank just make sure that the outlet for the air is
not in the bottom of the tank.
/ Robin
drabslab
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Posted: Monday, December 11, 2006 - 09:49 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I guess it depends on what type of compressor it is, but it is my understanding that oil in a compressor, doesn't necessarily mean oil in the airline.



very correct!

I have worked in a company making coaches and busses scale 1:1 (with other words, real ones).

Some of these coaches were sold to travel companies, others were specially designed for e.g. Formula one teams or touring pop stars. I guess that you understand that the paint jobs on these things had to be perfect.


We were using, of course, large industrial compressors (Imagine painting a 12 meter long bus using a small airbrush). All these compressors were oil lubricated, just like your car engine.

And we did not get too much oil in the compressed air. If your car is in good condition it doesn't consume a lot of oil either.

But we also had very good filters for the air used for airbrushing: not only to remove the oil particles but also the water and dust.

Currently, I am using a standard compressor for airbrushing, of course with a water and oil seperator attached to it. I use this compressor also for pumping up the tyres of the car, for household jobs, for whatever one needs some compressed air.

I prefer this multi purpose thing above a dedicated airbrush compressor that can only be used for this purpose alone.
HunterCottage
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Posted: Tuesday, December 12, 2006 - 01:51 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I prefer this multi purpose thing above a dedicated airbrush compressor that can only be used for this purpose alone.



My Silair is quite oversized for my airbrushing purposes, but I use it to drive a lugnut (gun/pisto/thingyl) to help change tires and stuff. I've used it more for other things that model-airbrushing. It did run me much more than a "normal" compressor, but the job I bought it for, paid for itself many times over!!! I've run five normal (=model sized airbrushs) without too much problem. The air transportation was a bit makeshift....